Don’t worry, blondes aren’t going away; and the paucity of hit records

  • The Disappearing Blonde Gene
    Status: Hoax reported as news Peter Frost has an article in the current issue of Evolution and Human Behavior in which he argues that the trait for blonde hair evolved 10,000 years ago in northern Europe because men found blonde women to be attractive–and because there were more women than men, the women had to compete for the men. (I’m simplifying his argument a lot.) But I’m not bringing this up to make a point about Frost’s article. Instead, I’m bringing it up because the London Times discusses his article ..

    So it should be called the Hoax Blonde Disappearing Gene? Is it some sort of blonde joke in its own right?
    There is something faintly depressing though about the way that “stories” like these just slide right into print without tripping all sorts of questions. If you’ve never experienced newsdesk desperation, the answer to why will elude you always.
    (Seen at Museum of Hoaxes)

  • From the BPI’s submission on DRM to the All Parliamentary Internet Group:
    In 2004, 6,127 singles and 29,510 albums were released in the UK5. Just 250 sold over 100,000 copies. The industry rule of thumb is that less than one in 10 releases is a hit (i.e. features in the music charts). Far fewer make a profit.

    Yow. That’s quite a small number beating 100,000: less than 1%. Think about that for a moment (because I think it’s the 100,000 mark that is needed for a physical CD to start making back its marketing costs). Viva Long Tail and the march of catalogue (points to a post which analyses, with graphs, “hit” album sales in the US over the past few decades and shows that the “Golden Age” was around 1972), eh?

One thought on “Don’t worry, blondes aren’t going away; and the paucity of hit records”

  1. “I think itís the 100,000 mark that is needed for a physical CD to start making back its marketing costs”

    Depends how much you spend on marketing though, I suppose. Clap Your Hands Say Yeah sold, I believe, 25,000 copies of theiralbum without being signed to a label at all. Just gigging, web site reviews and word of mouth.

Comments are closed.